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Doctors Recommend

The Full 10 Test Panel

Doctors Recommend

The Full 10 Test Panel

The 10-Test Panel is a comprehensive STD testing package that tests for the most common bacterial and viral STDs in the United States. This inclusive STD testing panel has been carefully designed by physicians to provide you with complete peace of mind.

If you are concerned about recent exposure, we recommend adding the HIV RNA Early Detection Test. The HIV RNA Early Detection Test can detect an HIV infection as early as 6 days after exposure and is conclusive if taken 9 to 11 days post exposure.

The standard HIV test is a 4th Generation HIV 1 & 2 Antibody/Antigen test that can detect HIV as early as 2-3 weeks after exposure.

  • Hiv Type 1
  • Hiv Type 2
  • Herpes 1
  • Herpes 2
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • Syphilis

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10 Test Panel

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$258
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INDIVIDUAL TESTS
HIV Type 1&2
$49
Chlamydia
$59
Gonorrhea
$59
Syphilis
$49
Herpes 1
$45
Herpes 2
$45
Hepatitis A
$24
Hepatitis B
$24
Hepatitis C
$24
HIV Early Detection
$119
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10 TEST PANEL
MOST POPULAR
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$139
$15 Off Coupon Applied During Checkout
10 TEST PANEL
WITH HIV EARLY DETECTION
$258
$15 Off Coupon Applied During Checkout
HIV Type 1&2
Chlamydia
Gonorrhea
Syphilis
Herpes 1
Herpes 2
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
HIV Early Detection
FULL TEST PANEL
MOST POPULAR
N/A
$139
$15 Off Coupon Applied During Checkout
FULL TEST PANEL
WITH HIV EARLY DETECTION
$258
$15 Off Coupon Applied During Checkout
INDIVIDUAL TESTS
HIV Type 1&2
$49
Chlamydia
$59
Gonorrhea
$59
Syphilis
$49
Herpes 1
$45
Herpes 2
$45
Hepatitis A
$24
Hepatitis B
$24
Hepatitis C
$24
HIV Early Detection
$119
$15 Off Coupon Applied During Checkout

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INFORMATION

Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea causes infections in the genitals, rectum and throat and is spread by vaginal, anal and oral sex. This STD occurs in both men and women and can be passed from mother to child during childbirth.

Testing method: Blood test, urine test, anal swab, urethral swab, cervical swab, throat swab

Testing time: Under five minutes

Time to results: One to five days

Symptoms: Many men and women are asymptomatic but may complain of bladder or urethral infections. Symptoms of these infections can include painful or burning sensations during urination, frequent urination or urgency when needing to urinate, as well as cloudy or bloody urine. When a rectal infection is present, symptoms include discharge, itching, soreness and bleeding.

When you should get tested after exposure: Within five days to two weeks of exposure and two weeks after treatment.

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INFORMATION

Chlamydia

Chlamydia occurs in both men and women. It can cause long-term damage to the female reproductive system, preventing women from being able to carry a child after infection.

Testing method: Blood test, urine test, throat swab, rectal swab, cervical swab, vaginal swab

Testing time: Under five minutes

Time to results: Two to 10 days

Symptoms: Chlamydia can be asymptomatic for many infected persons. In women, chlamydia might cause vaginal discharge and painful urination. In men symptoms might include discharge from the penis, painful urination, swelling and pain in one or both testicles.

When you should get tested after exposure: Within one to two weeks of exposure with retesting after three months. Pregnant women should re-test within three to four weeks after treatment to ensure that the infection has been successfully eradicated.

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INFORMATION

Syphilis

Syphilis is a curable, yet serious STD that can lead to a broad range of complications or even death. This infection is transmitted via vaginal, anal and oral sex.

Testing method: Blood or spinal tap

Testing time: Under five minutes for a blood test, approximately 30 minutes for a spinal tap

Time to results: Three to five days

Symptoms: While many people don't experience any symptoms initially, others might experience painless sores, rash, fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches, fatigue and organ failure.

When you should get tested after exposure: Within three weeks of sores appearing and six to twelve months after treatment.

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INFORMATION

Herpes

Herpes is transmitted via oral, anal or genital sex with another individual who has herpes sores or lesions. It can also be spread by coming into contact with the saliva of a person with oral herpes or skin-to-skin contact with someone who is experiencing an outbreak. It's important to note that herpes is not always sexually transmitted.

Testing method: Blood test or swab of mucosal sore

Testing time: Under five minutes

Time to results: Two to four days for rapid test, up to 14 days for standard culture

Symptoms: Lesions or small blisters on the mouth, genitals or rectum. Symptoms are only present during an active outbreak and therefore, many individuals don't know they've been infected.

When you should get tested after exposure: One to four months

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INFORMATION

HIV

Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) attacks a person's immune system and without aggressive treatment, can result in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV and AIDS are currently incurable but treatments are available to slow the progression of HIV.

Testing method: Blood, saliva, blood nucleic acid

Testing time: Under five minutes

Time to results: Rapid testing can provide results in under 30 minutes, standard tests take one to three days

Symptoms: Flu-like symptoms (chills, fever, aches) often occur two to four weeks after exposure but many individuals don't experience any initial symptoms.

When you should get tested after exposure: 10 to 90 days, depending on testing type

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INFORMATION

Hepatitis A, B & C

Hepatitis can be transmitted via contact with human fecal matter or genital intercourse with an infected individual. It's also commonly transmitted by those who share injectable drugs.

Testing method: Blood

Testing time: Under five minutes

Time to results: Rapid testing can provide results in 20 to 30 minutes, standard tests take one to three days

Symptoms: Many infected individuals are asymptomatic while others may experience symptoms such as fever, fatigue, appetite loss, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, pale stool, joint pain and jaundice.

When you should get tested after exposure: Three to six weeks for hepatitis A and B, hepatitis C may take as long as eight to 11 weeks before antibodies are detectable

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References:

  • Chlamydia and gonorrhea: screening. final update summary: chlamydia and gonorrhea: screening - US Preventive Services Task Force. Available at: https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/chlamydia-and-gonorrhea-screening. Accessed March 28, 2018.
  • Screening recommendations and considerations referenced in treatment guidelines and original sources. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016.
  • Women's Health Care Physicians. Sexually transmitted infections: resource overview - ACOG. Available at: https://www.acog.org/Womens-Health/Sexually-Transmitted-Infections. Accessed April 11, 2018.
  • Committee on Adolescence and Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine : Screening for nonviral sexually transmitted infections in adolescents and young adults. Pediatrics 2014; 134: pp. e302-e311
  • Lee K.C., Ngo-Metzger Q., Wolff T., et al: Sexually transmitted infections: recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Am Fam Physician 2016; 94: pp. 907-915
  • US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) : Screening for syphilis infection in nonpregnant adults and adolescents US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. JAMA 2016; 315: pp. 2321-2327
  • Yang B., Hallmark C.J., Huang J.S., et al: Characteristics and risk of syphilis diagnosis among HIV-infected male cohort: a population-based study in Houston, Texas. Sex Transm Dis 2013; 40: pp. 957-963
  • Mattei P.I., Beachkofsky T.M., Gilson R.T., et al: Syphilis: a reemerging infection. Am Fam Physician 2012; 86: pp. 433-440
  • Syphilis during pregnancy. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016.
  • Emmanuel P.J., and Martinez J.: Adolescents and HIV infection: the pediatrician’s role in promoting routine testing. Pediatrics 2011; 128: pp. 1023-1029
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV among men in the United States. MSM testing initiatives. 2017. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/group/gender/men/index.html. Accessed April 22, 2018.
  • The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Women’s Healthcare Physicians. Clinical guidelines: perinatal screening. Number 635, June 2015. Available at: https://www.acog.org/Clinical-Guidance-and-Publications/Committee-Opinions/Committee-on-Obstetric-Practice/Prenatal-and-Perinatal-Human-Immunodeficiency-Virus-Testing-Expanded-Recommendations. Accessed April 18, 2018.
  • United States Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) April 2013. 2016. Available at: https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Home/GetFileByID/1890. Accessed April 12, 2018.
  • National HIV Curriculum. HIV screening recommendations. Rational for routine HIV screening. 2017. Available at: https://www.hiv.uw.edu/go/screening-diagnosis/recommendations-testing/core-concept/all. Accessed April 22, 2018.
  • Hepatitis B Virus Infection: Screening, 2014. Final update summary: hepatitis B virus infection: screening, 2014 - US Preventive Services Task Force. Available at: https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/hepatitis-b-virus-infection-screening-2014. Accessed April 6, 2018.
  • Hepatitis C: screening. Final update summary: hepatitis C: screening - US Preventive Services Task Force. Available at: https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/hepatitis-c-screening. Accessed April 13, 2018.
  • HCV in Pregnancy | HCV guidance. Available at: https://www.hcvguidelines.org/unique-populations/pregnancy. Accessed April 10, 2018. Huynh K, Kahwaji CI. HIV Testing. [Updated 2020 Apr 30]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020 Jan-. Available from: https://www-ncbi-nlm-nih-gov.ezproxy.rush.edu/books/NBK482145/
Safer STD Testing
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Disclaimer 

Safer STD Testing is an informational referral website. It refers customers to nationally reputed private STD Testing service providers (“Preferred Service Providers” or “Advertisers”). Safer STD Testing is not a medical or healthcare professional facility or a provider of any medical or healthcare services. Safer STD Testing gets compensated on net purchase of products or services by our users referred to such Preferred Service Providers. Click here to read our full disclaimer.